NEW Italian Genealogy Records Online for Palermo and Chieti, Italy

Today, FamilySearch.org–the Internet’s largest library of *free* global genealogy images and searchable records, announced two exciting new additions to their web site for Italian American genealogy researchers:

  1. A brand new collection of 4+ million searchable images of Palermo’s government birth, death, and marriage records for the years 1820-1947 (to browse the images, visit this link: https://www.familysearch.org/collection/2608509)
  2. The addition of new images to their Chieti, Italy collection of government birth, death, and marriage records for the years 1809-1930, which now totals more than 3 million images (to browse the images, visit this link: https://www.familysearch.org/collection/2419833)

You might need a membership to view these images, but remember, as always: membership to FamilySearch is FREE. Thank you, FamilySearch, for your tireless, generous service to the genealogy community!

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My Blurb in Italy Genealogy Travel Article

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Me, studying baptismal records at the Diocesan Archive of Novarra, Italy

I am honored to have contributed to the article of a brave adventurer about his exciting Italy trip, written by author Matt Crossman for Thrillist. Matt invited me to share a bit of retrospective genealogy advice for his readers, which he featured alongside the research tips that he gleaned from personal experience as he trekked through Italy in search of his own ancestors and family. Note the pure poetry in the article’s Taylor Swift reference, because my advice therein can be summed up as a Taylor Swift paraphrase: “Create a blank space, baby, and they’ll write the names!”

Read the full article here: https://www.thrillist.com/travel/nation/find-family-ancestors-genealogy-sites/travel

Infographic: Genealogy Evidence and Proof

Some changes were made to genealogy standards over the summer; with the publication of Dr. Thomas W. Jones’ text Mastering Genealogical Proof  by the National Genealogical Society in June, I had to revise my genealogy proof infographic to reflect the additional categories of sources, evidence, and information contained in Jones’ book. Below is the revised infographic of those concepts, in my own words, and I will be revising it again after the February release of the new BCG standards manual if I note any changes, so stay tuned to this post for any edits/updates! 🙂

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